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The Battery – Historic Charleston Attraction

While visiting Charleston, South Carolina most visitors are interested in learning about the Historical landmarks.  As most know, Charleston is one of the most historic areas in South Carolina.  There are a great number of sites to see and places to visit.  One of the most popular Historic Charleston Attractions is The Battery.  This landmark runs along the lower shores of the Charleston peninsula and is surrounded by the Ashley and Cooper Rivers.  This area is most famously known for their antebellum homes.  This history of The Battery began first became a promenade, and was used as a public park beginning in 1837.  Today the area is well known as White Point Garden.

While going along the White Point Gardens there are many beautiful sites to be seen.  Some of the amazing sits are large southern live oak trees, some memorials, and a few pieces of artillery which had been used during the United States Civil War.  Combine The Battery and White Point Garden together and they typically are referred to as “The Battery Park.”  However, the City of Charleston never officially declared them as one single entity.

If you are planning a trip to The Battery, it is recommended to take a full day to see all of the sites.  It is known as one of the best spots in Charleston.  This spot is placed perfectly on the waterfront with many features to see.  Some include cannons, oak trees, palmettos, a gazebo, and the Sullivan Island Lighthouse.  The park is also great for a day trip because you will get to enjoy the outdoors and there are many activities.  Let the kids play in the park while you sit down and relax.  Take a long stroll along the waterfront park and pass the harbor and imagine all of the battles that have occurred across the waterway.  While staying at French Quarter Inn step outside to Historic Charleston and take in the history.

Posted in News by French Quarter Inn on August 15, 2012

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